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Door made out of maple wood – accurate fit

I bought your MTO CD a while back and look what happened! I built my very own pizza oven! It was a lot of hard work but check out the attached pictures!

I have baked just about everything from pizzas to a pig, roast chicken, pork, turkey and much more. Thank you Rado for a great CD, it was a great inspiration.

My neighbor made the oven door out of a 2 inch thick piece of maple wood. It is lined with an oven seal and a piece of aluminum to protect the wood from the heat. It seals inside the arch perfectly as we used the plywood form from the arch design as a template.

Practical structure in garden

I have many pictures taken throughout the construction of the oven from start to finish if you or anyone would like to see them, I can send them.

Door made from maple wood A garden structure for very practical uses Very practical garden structures

Again, Many Thanks,
Chris L.
Cape Coral, Florida USA

Respond to the Door made out of maple wood – accurate fit article:

26 Comments - post your thoughts

  1. Would like to recieve building instructions, dimensions, materials list ect. on this pizza oven. Would like to build one with a pizza oven and a bar-b-que, I am a mason by trade.

    By David Ford — Permalink

  2. I really like the pictures you posted of your brick oven. What can I do to get a plan or perhaps more of your pictures to see how you built it from start to finish.

    By Lolo Cardenas — Permalink

  3. hie, plz send me dimensions, and steps on how to build such a pizza oven, am in plumtree and would like to start my own pizza business. thanks vincent

    By vincent ndlovu — Permalink

  4. Hello, your oven really looks great, If you have pictures to make the oven please send me.

    Thank You

    By Strahil Glavchev — Permalink

  5. Looks great. Please send pics and plans for such project!


    By Tom AckleyPermalink

  6. that is is beautiful , I would love to build one also ! may i see your pics and plans on how to do so .
    thanks Rich

    By Rich Dilorenzo — Permalink

  7. Hi, wouldn’t mind a squizz at those plans/ pictures myself for help if you are happy to send them over!

    By Will — Permalink

  8. What a beautiful oven. I have been contemplating building an oven, and now that I have seen yours I would like to get going.

    If you could send any pictures drawings and whatever info you have I would greatly appreciate it.

    By +Gary Motshagen — Permalink

  9. Beautiful oven, just the right amount of brickwork and great color. Would love to see more pics, I was wondering what the inside dimensions are, and hight of the roof inside.

    By Mike — Permalink

  10. Absolutely gorgeous oven! What a clean finish! I would definitely enjoy seeing your pictures from start to finish. Please post them ;) Maybe I can build one oven by summer. Thanks.

    By Pictures from start to finish. — Permalink

  11. I have had more compliments on my desktop picture of this oven. Dido, plans please as I’ve already claimed my spot in the backyard for this one! Great Job!

    By LES — Permalink

  12. I would love any info you’re willing to share. I’m getting ready to build one this summer, and think your design will look great here in Texas. Thanks!

    By Joni — Permalink

  13. Rado,
    have just ordered your DVD with building directions and images on the subject of oven building. Among the least expensive brick like building materials used in the arid southwest US are cinder-blocks, which are made from a cement like substance, and adobe, which is made from hard clay. Do you have any experience with these, and are they suitable substitutes for chimney type brick? I will wait for the plans first to see it everything more clearly. Thank you, my friend. I’ll look forward to your CD and DVD and building one of these fantastic ovens. For the past 10 years I’ve cooked almost all of my meals outside, smoking chicken, pork, fish and during hunting season in New Mexico, ducks and geese. I’ve always had to buy pizza and now I’ll be able to make my own! I am an old-timer (80) and currently bake Italian style bread and thin crust pizza in our electric wall oven. Comes out real good but takes a long time and is a pain. Want to build a brick oven but don’t want to spend the rest of my life gathering wood. Do you have any recommendations for a gas fired oven in your project building disk ?? Thanks again!

    My baking consists of 1200 gms. of dough to make 12 lunch rolls that I eat, 3 times a week, each during a round of Golf and occasionally with Sausage and Broccoli Rape ( or peppers ) or Cajun Chicken. The reason for the 12″ is that my 15″ x 20″ x 3/4″ pizza stone can’t hold any more.

    I also bake 1350 gms of Italian bread ( 3 lbs ) which we consume at dinner. Again that amount for the reason above.

    Every Friday night, I bake a 13″ pizza for the wife and I. Sometimes for company, I’ll bake 2 pizzas. I have 2 pizza stones. I place one in the top and the other in the bottom of my electric oven. Although my baked products are excellent in quality, temperature control is a pain. Can’t get it as hot as I would like it for the pizza and tough to keep a steady 360 for 32 minutes for the bread. I’m looking for something simple and portable ( 24″ x 30″….. 30″ x 30″ ) to build. Or improvise. Your idea on the single burner stove is a good one. Imagine I would want the energy output at least 20,000 BTUs.

    BTW: I use Northern USA King Arthur hard wheat bread flour and make my bread dough with a starter ( 180 gms 80 deg. water, 150 gms flour, 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast and a pinch of sugar. – 8 hrs ).

    Oldest friend, since grammar school, went into the bread business with his father at age 19. He retired 12 years before I did, and with a lot more money. Dom taught me a trick that made him a lot of money. As soon as the bread comes out of the oven, wrap it in aluminum foil and throw it in the Freezer. When ready to eat, put it in the oven at 450 deg F for about 12 minutes to heat … and eat. That is how he made his money. He would do that just before the people coming homer from work, would get off the train, would go into his store to get “Fresh Baked Brad right out of the oven. I use the toaster oven for the same effect and it’s brilliant, a new dimension to the bread so to speak.

    With my starter, we can use portions of a loaf and refreeze / reuse the rest several times and it still tastes “fresh Baked”.


    By Leonard — Permalink

  14. Can you send some pictures with instructions on how you built it?

    Thank you

    By Jerry — Permalink

  15. Hello Chris.

    Great looking oven. I would love to have the pictures posted. Would that be possible?

    Kind regards.

    By LeoPermalink

  16. Loved the idea of being able to build my own brick oven. I think I have a lot of the materials already. Please send me pictures, material list and other information as indicated above. Thanks.

    By Scott Walker — Permalink

  17. Hi Chris;

    Good looking oven! Do you mind sending me some pictures as well. I am in the process of starting my oven, and I will build a barrel dome, like yours? Thanks.


    By zack — Permalink

  18. Wow,
    I haven’t come back to this site for a couple months and did not realize there were so many comments on my oven. I would be happy to share any information and photos I have. I will have my neighbor and friend, Scott, comment on his maple wood oven door. I have better pictures showing all angles of the door construction. It works really well and helps hold in the heat for several days. I will try to reply to all who have commented. Thank you!

    By Chris Lamaritata — Permalink

  19. Would love to get the plans as well. It is exactly what I was hoping to build.


    By pat — Permalink

  20. Great looking oven! I’m just beginning to build one and would love to more photos and info on your oven.

    By Carlo — Permalink

  21. Chris, Greg here from Ft Myers,
    Your oven turned out very nice, GREAT JOB!! And Scott did a nice job on the door,” Mr. Woodworker” himself ha! Tell him hello for me.
    For all your fans, I would incourage them to order Rado’s CD for all the information pictures etc. I think it would be tough to build from a few pictures and a couple of deminsions huh?

    Again, good job Chris, Scott.

    By Greg — Permalink

  22. Would love some pics on the construction, my slab is poured and am currently building the hearth slab foundation, I want to do a smooth stucco look like you did, it’s a beautiful design. Thanks!

    By Larz Hull — Permalink

  23. I love your pizza oven, could you send me all the instructions how to do my own… Thank you :-D

    By Rosa — Permalink

  24. Great job. Would you mind sharing more details. I am planning one with a wooden base as well. Thanks.


    By zack — Permalink

  25. Hi, my name is Mike and am building an oven on a steel cart. Have the floor complete and thats it so far. The floor is 2.5 inches thick sitting on .5 inch concrete board and air exposed underneath. My question is how many pizzas could I cook with good crust consistency with a 3 inch floor before I would have to pull coals back over cooking area? I’ve read that with each pizza it sucks some of the heat out of the bricks. New to this so your best quess would be awesome. Could add another layer of 1 inch fire brick to the floor yet if it cools to quickly. Also would like to obtain you CDROM tutorials and pay for them but site is confusing me on how to do that. Thanks Mike., do love the site by the way!

    added by Rado: Dear Mike,
    thank you for the note. It depends on not too many factors; insulation under the heat absorbing dense layer (e.g. the concrete pad) on which
    firebricks sit – thickness of the dense layer inclusive of firebricks floor – how was an oven heated it up.

    The floor will cool down the same way with or without pizzas being placed on, as there is air circulating. It always depends on how were the 3 floor layers built and plus of course the whole firebrick part in general. You can get 20 minutes of quality cooking time or you can get 2+ hours quality cooking time from a single floor heat up before reheating with embers again. You would appreciate to see the 3 floor parts/layers and how they are done in the 3G MTo oven design; to achieve what’s here below.

    Remember that in brick ovens individual pizzas take anywhere between under 2 minutes to 3 or 4 minutes to cook. 90 seconds and pizza done, 1-1/2 minute, is normal – nothing extra nor special to achieve. Have a look at the photos (linked just here), and also read the text bit on each page as I think there are the hints (they are not tricks, it’s all very simple). It took ages before the floor at the beginning cooled down, after firing, for the first pizzas could be placed inside. Then from that point, 2 hours of quality cooking time followed without doing anything else. It all depends on the factors I mentioned in 1st paragraph above.
    1. Making pizzas in a hot oven
    2. Making pizzas in a hot oven
    3. Making pizzas in a hot oven

    Regarding the oven building workshop on cd’s or by quicker downloads (download versions are exactly identical in content to disk versions) basically; for all worldwide destinations it’s $6.50, that covers expenses to send the oven building cd out by priority AirMail, or by download (from our quality online storage account we hire). The page linked below gives more details also on my second workshop cd for building Masterly Tail oven design (more details further below). Buttons are down the page. People at times donate to the w/site cause, basically I include this second original MTo design in the mail or download automatically to everyone who supports with $30+, including also the third 3G MTo design – it’s for business or cold climate and very easily built out of dry-stack cement blocks, very effectively and absolutely compact. As a main feature of a place it looks real nice too. Thank you.

    Warm regards,

    By Mike — Permalink

  26. Hi,

    I would like to build an oven using local quarry stone veneer done in a similar manner to that of the American guy (Jim) that shot the pretty good film on your site called “Australian oven 2”. I will build this oven in Maryland, USA. An email version would be great to have them here sooner. Which is the best one for this and how can I do this?

    added by Rado:
    Hi Paul,
    It is the MTo design but collected field stones were used on the outside instead of house bricks. Stones give a great character to wood fired ovens as well. Please read in my previous reply just here above. Thank you.

    By Paul — Permalink

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