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Nikon D800 for technical macro photography?

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The main intention is to use this Nikon D800 D-SLR for my work. We already have AF-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.8G Lens. Not bad camera lens for macro’s either. Technical macro, flour types and building material is mainly what I am going to photograph with this set up. Ah I have big plans. Some of the images will be appearing also on traditionaloven.com

On my recent trip to Europe, half work and half holidays travel, I bought a new Nikon D800 digital SLR camera body. Secretly I was hoping to buy it somewhere on the way in transit in a duty free shop but I couldn’t see this new model at the airports at all. Then in the week 7, my last holidays week, in a little camera store in the city Martin (Slovakia), that shop used to be called “Photo – Kino”, I spotted it. The price was 2699 EUR equals only AUD$3252. Whoaaaa! Compared to otherwise AUD$3699 which is the recommended retail price tag for this same D800 Nikon at home in Brisbane. Although I overheard currently there is a 30+ days waiting time due to a higher demand for this is a new product.

Nikon D800 new in box.

Simply I was just very lucky that no one interested in buying the same camera saw it before me. I bought it on Thursday whilst the camera came to this shop on Tuesday.

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8 Comments - post your thoughts

  1. You should do just about anything you want with this camera. I just got a D200 used and it’s fantastic. This is Nikon light years ahead, although I don’t know what more you could ask of a camera!

    By Jeff — Permalink

  2. Nikon d800 is very suitable for macro work indeed. For that matter or other matters like landscapes, portraits, activities, even night sky universe clouds in magnificent color. This camera model can photograph everything one can think of. The macro lens AF-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.8G is great, currently it’s the top macro lens on the market for nikons uh but pricey. The equivalent Sigma version has good quality too. Eventually I will buy it second hand once someone trades it in the camera shop I usually go to.

    There is also the “reverse lens” technique for making macro photographs on a budget — it allows to make beautiful close ups images also in the 1:1 ratio, magnified to extreme sizes, even greater than 1:1 magnification — with cheaper lenses used. One multipurpose 50mm prime lens in reverse or two lenses stacking connected together where only the second reversing lens is mounted backwards. There goes a coupling ring between the two lenses to attach them both. Try that system too — about half inch from the photographed subject, with using 3 sec or 10 sec timer plus the camera on tripod for making steady shots! One reverse mount adapter ring for the specific Nikon or other camera model is needed, it costs less than 10 bucks in shops and you all set up. Diffused light conditions help. Here is a similar system described in more detail with images:
    http://digital-photography-school.com/reverse-lens-macro-close-up-photography-lesson-3

    By Nicholas — Permalink

  3. The secret of D800 Nikon camera is that it can be used for all kinds of photographing. Stills and also some recording, the macros, other close ups, anything you intend to photograph will be marvelous. But also fast moving subjects like with sports photography. This d800 or d800e does the lot in a professional manner. As I understand it, here in Australia, the recommended retail price is on average 3799$ for this camera, its body only, 100$ more, and the D800E version is dearer by 200+ bucks as practiced by retailers.

    By Oliver — Permalink

  4. What differences are there between a Hasselblad camera and this Japanese made Nikon D800, or the more sensitive D800E version? With optics made in Japan that is not elsewhere. I heard that astronauts use only Nikon cameras in space nowadays. Previously it was the Hasselblads. I also heard, roughly 8 years back in financial forecasts, that company Nikon was about to (initially) raise over company Canon fast, influencing customers perspective therefore inflate sales, by its name as it is closely sounding to Nikkei – stocks. What do you think was that money forecast correct?

    By Hasselblad or Nikon — Permalink

  5. Should I buy the Nikon D800 or the Nikon D4 for work mostly on macro and close up subjects, examples would be various plates and culinary images. I am thinking of going with the D800 camera mainly because it has the new decent sensor.

    By Dave — Permalink

  6. does it bake bread

    By tim bactu — Permalink

  7. You’ll love the D800. I just upgraded from the D200, which is a great camera itself, and the differences are amazing.

    Dave- I’d only spend the extra $3000usd on the D4 if you need it’s features— mainly the insane frame rate or low light. Typically this is for sports or wedding photography. The D800 should be fantastic in a controlled env like what you have described.

    By Phillip Salzman — Permalink

  8. I love how he unboxes this expensive camera perilously on the edge of a chair. Brilliant move, one tap to the chair and bam, down it goes. Metal alloy body or not, please be careful.

    By Jim — Permalink

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